About Bakeapples

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"Bakeapple" is a local name for cloudberry and is used throughout Newfoundland, Labrador and eastern Quebec. Opinions differ on the origin of the name. Some say it derives from the taste, said to resemble the flavour of a baked apple. Others suggest that it's an historical corruption of the French, "baie qu'appelle?" or "what's this berry called?" (Though the French-speaker may have been asking the name of the bay, while eating bakeapples....)

 

Description

Rubus chamaemorus, Rose Family

This plant is commonly found in moist peat bogs of the region and has a stout, leafy stem that ranges from 15-40 cm in height. The flowers are white, the leaves dark green. Flowers appear in late May to early June and produces a single fruit that changes colour from July to September. Initially red, the berries fade to pale orange when ripe (in local parlance bakeapples are red when they're "green"!).

The berry is rich in vitamin C and is widely used to make jams, jellies, syrups, pies and more. The berry lends its name to our Bakeapple Folk Festival held annually in August.

 

Bakeapple Recipes

All recipes are from the Pure Labrador Cookbook and contributed by Ethyl Flynn.

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